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Handling counter offers

accepting job offer

A counter-offer is an offer from your current employer to rival the one you have received from your future employer, to convince you to stay.

Counter-offers can take many forms: a straight increase in salary, additional company benefits, a sought-after promotion or new job title, additional responsibility, a change in role, more involvement in projects that interest you - or any combination of these. 

When it comes to resigning consider the correct etiquette, how you will inform your employer and dealing with second thoughts.

 


Reasons to keep you

Counter-offers can be confusing. Leaving a job, especially if you have been there for some time, is difficult. Being put under pressure to stay, and having your reasons for leaving challenged or undermined, does not make easy listening.

As enticing as counter offers may appear to be, it is important to keep a clear head, take a step back and consider the options available.

Reasons why an employer might want you to stay include:

  • Replacing an employee can be expensive

  • It might mess up their budget to re-recruit that time of year

  • They have not got time to re-recruit right now

  • They want to have you cover while they hunt for your replacement

  • They want you to finish the project you are working on

  • They don't have the time to train someone new at the moment

  • Losing staff might reflect badly on your employer

 

Should I stay or should I go?

There is rarely a good reason to accept a counter-offer and stay where you are. You wanted to move, you've been through the recruitment process, you've been successful and you have scored a job that meets your criteria.

Think about these factors:

  • From the day of your resignation, your loyalty will always be in question

  • This lack of loyalty is likely to be an obstacle to future promotions

  • Your colleagues will look at you differently - after all, you do not really want to be there do you?

  • Your boss will probably start casting around for your replacement immediately - whether you stay or not

  • Why are they offering you what you deserve now, rather than before your resignation?

  • Has the real reason you resigned been adequately addressed?

  • How guilty do you really feel? After all, should you not be putting yourself first? Would the company think twice about getting shot of you if the chips were down?

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Rocky ride

Do not let an unexpected counter offer stop you in your tracks. Take it in your stride, thank your employer for the opportunity and reaffirm your intention to leave. Stand your ground.

However, should you decide not to leave for pastures new, be aware that your resignation has not been forgotten.

You are going to have to work extremely hard to win back your employer's trust. You might have to strive harder than your colleagues to prove your loyalty and worthiness as a long-term prospect.

Your new post-resignation life with your old company is not going to be easy.

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